Sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea. Asunto C-282/19 (MIUR y Ufficio Scolastico Regionale per la Campania) de 13 de enero de 2021
Procedimiento prejudicial — Política social — Directiva 1999/70/CE — Acuerdo Marco de la CES, la UNICE y el CEEP sobre el trabajo de duración determinada — Cláusulas 4 y 5 — Contratos de trabajo de duración determinada en el sector público — Profesores de religión católica — Concepto de “razones objetivas” que justifican la renovación de tales contratos — Necesidad permanente de sustitución de personal
En el asunto C-282/19, que tiene por objeto una petición de decisión prejudicial planteada, con arreglo al artículo 267 TFUE, por el Tribunale di Napoli (Tribunal Ordinario de Nápoles, Italia), mediante resolución de 13 de febrero de 2019, recibida en el Tribunal de Justicia el 3 de abril de 2019, en el procedimiento entre YT, ZU, AW, BY, CX, DZ, EA, FB, GC, IE, JF, KG, LH, MI, NY, PL, HD, OK y Ministero dell’Istruzione, dell’Università e della Ricerca — MIUR, Ufficio Scolastico Regionale per la Campania, con intervención de: Federazione GILDA-UNAMS (Curia, 13.1.2022)

CoverTeachers in Europe Careers, Development and Well-being
Luxemburgo: OPOCE, Eurydice Report, 24 marzo 2021

Teachers play an essential role in the learning process and in making it a fruitful experience for all students. The pandemic, the rapid transition from face-to-face to distance learning have further highlighted their essential contribution to our societies. If in one hand, teachers’ role is evolving as new demands and expectations arise, together with new responsibilities, on the other hand, this profession has been going through a vocational crisis for some years now. National and European policy-makers have been developing solutions to mitigate the impact of shortages and maintain high quality teaching standards. This report, focused on lower secondary teachers (ISCED 2), contributes to the debate by providing evidence on both policies and practices. It combines Eurydice data on national legislation with data on teachers’ practices and perceptions from the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS). These two data sources together shed light on the impact produced by national policies on teachers’ behaviours. It also provides ground for evidence-based reforms. The report covers all 27 EU Member States, as well as the United Kingdom, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Norway, Serbia and Turkey. [+]

CoverTeachers' and School Heads' Salaries and Allowances in Europe 2017/18
Luxemburgo: OPOCE ,2019. Eurydice Report

5th October is World Teacher Day and Eurydice celebrates with a new report. Teachers are at the centre of education and salaries are an important element in making a profession attractive. In which country do teachers get the highest pay in Europe? How have their salaries changed?

This yearly Eurydice publication analyses salaries of teachers and school heads in pre-primary, primary and general secondary public schools in 42 European education systems in 2017/18. It also shows the main changes over the last three years. Moreover, it looks into the average actual salaries (including allowances and other additional payments) in relation with the per capita GDP and the earnings of other tertiary-educated workers. The report includes national sheets with extensive information on the salaries, the allowances and other additional payments that teachers and school heads receive. Data is collected jointly by the Eurydice and the OECD/NESLI networks. [+]

Sentencia del Tribunal de Justicia de la Unión Europea. Asunto C-72/18 (Daniel Ustariz Aróstegui/Departamento de Educación del Gobierno de Navarra) de 20 de junio de 2019
Procedimiento prejudicial — Política social — Directiva 1999/70/CE — Acuerdo Marco de la CES, la UNICE y el CEEP sobre el Trabajo de Duración Determinada — Cláusula 4, apartado 1 — Principio de no discriminación — Sector de la enseñanza pública — Normativa nacional que concede un complemento retributivo únicamente a los profesores funcionarios de carrera — Exclusión de los profesores contratados administrativos — Concepto de “razones objetivas” — Características inherentes a la condición de funcionario de carrera
En el asunto C‑72/18, que tiene por objeto una petición de decisión prejudicial planteada, con arreglo al artículo 267 TFUE, por el Juzgado de lo Contencioso-Administrativo n.º 1 de Pamplona, mediante auto de 26 de enero de 2018, recibido en el Tribunal de Justicia el 5 de febrero de 2018, en el procedimiento entre Daniel Ustariz Aróstegui y Departamento de Educación del Gobierno de Navarra (Curia.europa.eu, 20.6.2019)

CoverTeachers' and School Heads' Salaries and Allowances in Europe 2016/17
Luxembourg: OPOCE, 2018. Eurydice Report

This report gives information on statutory salaries and allowances for teachers and school heads in pre-primary, primary and secondary public school. The comparative analyses, which includes 41 European education systems, shows an increase in teacher's pay but also differences in salary conditions and salary progression across Europe. Salaries have in fact increased by at least 3 % in 18 education systems. However, real salaries (i.e. discounting inflation) of beginning teachers are lower in nine European countries than in 2009/10 i.e. the years following the financial crisis. Differences between countries concern not only the level of basic salaries but also the number of years’ service necessary to achieve the maximum, which can go from 6 to 42 years depending on the country. Data displayed on the national sheets are collected jointly by the Eurydice and the OECD/ NESLI networks. [+]

CoverThe Organisation of School Time in Europe. Primary and General Secondary Education – 2018/19
Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency, 2018. Eurydice Reports

How is the school year organised across Europe? Despite some differences, countries show many similarities regarding the structure of their school calendars. In 10 countries/regions, school generally starts in August. The countries where the school year begins the earliest are Denmark and Finland. With regard to the number of school days, it varies between 156 days in Albania and 200 days in Denmark and Italy. In general, the number of school days is the same in primary and secondary education, but there are a few exceptions: in France (upper secondary education), Greece (in secondary education, teaching days and exam days are included) and Serbia for example, the number of schools days is higher in secondary education than in primary.

This report, based on national data, gives an overview on the length of the school year, the start and the end dates, the timing and length of school holidays and the number of school days. It covers both primary and general secondary education and key points are illustrated by comparative figures. The information is available for 38 countries participating in the EU's Erasmus+ programme (28 Member States, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, Norway, Serbia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and Turkey). [+]

CoverTeaching Careers in Europe: Access, Progression and Support
Luxembourg: OPOCE, 2017. Eurydice Report

At a time when the importance of teachers is becoming increasingly apparent, what are the main challenges in the teaching profession related to supply and demand? How do education systems address these issues? How does one qualify to be a teacher? What support is available once qualified? What are the career opportunities in this profession?

The comparative overview of national policies on teacher careers across Europe, which covers 43 European education systems, provides an analysis of different aspects of the teaching profession. The report focuses on primary and general secondary education. The main themes include: forward planning and main challenges in teacher supply and demand, entry to the teaching profession and teacher mobility, continuing professional development and support, career development, and teacher appraisal. [+]

213 EN eurdice briefModernisation on Higher Education in Europe: Academic Staff 2017
OPOCE, 2017. Eurydice Brief

The higher education sector has experienced profound changes in recent years. As student numbers have continued to increase, new steering and funding mechanisms have been established, quality assurance systems have been further developed and societal demands have expanded. Yet there has been too little focus on the impact and implications of these developments for academic staff, who play a vital role in higher education institutions and systems. 

The brief is based on a comprehensive report, Modernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Academic Staff – 2017published in June, which explores the realities for academic staff in this changing higher education landscape. The brief focuses on some of the main findings, including on human resource policy planning, academic careers, working conditions, and teaching. It concludes by highlighting three key concerns for policy-making: 'levelling the playing field for academic careers', 'balancing institutional autonomy and government oversight' and 'improving information gathering on academic staff'. [+]

CoverModernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Academic Staff 2017
Luxemburgo, OPOCE, 15 June 2017. Eurydice Report

The higher education sector has experienced profound changes in recent years. Student numbers have continued to increase, while the sector has diversified and experienced significant structural changes, such as new funding arrangements, and new quality assurance systems. The challenges for academic staff have also been growing. Staffs are responsible for teaching ever greater numbers of students, undertaking research, and responding to growing societal needs, while academic jobs become more competitive, and job security more tenuous.

Modernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Academic Staff – 2017 explores the current realities for academic staff within this changing higher education landscape. The report focuses on the qualification requirements for academic staff, the recruitment process, employment and working conditions in academia, the impact of external quality assurance, and top level strategies for internationalisation. It also includes national diagrams showing key characteristics of academic staff categories.

The report is based mainly on qualitative data gathered by the Eurydice Network, covering higher education systems in 35 countries. The data collection focused on academic higher education staff who are primarily responsible for teaching and/or research. In addition, quantitative data from Eurostat and the European Education Tertiary Register (ETER) are also used, as well as information gathered from surveys developed for this report to academic staff Trade Unions and Quality Assurance agencies. [+]

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