CoverModernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Academic Staff 2017
Luxemburgo, OPOCE, 15 June 2017. Eurydice Report

The higher education sector has experienced profound changes in recent years. Student numbers have continued to increase, while the sector has diversified and experienced significant structural changes, such as new funding arrangements, and new quality assurance systems. The challenges for academic staff have also been growing. Staffs are responsible for teaching ever greater numbers of students, undertaking research, and responding to growing societal needs, while academic jobs become more competitive, and job security more tenuous.

Modernisation of Higher Education in Europe: Academic Staff – 2017 explores the current realities for academic staff within this changing higher education landscape. The report focuses on the qualification requirements for academic staff, the recruitment process, employment and working conditions in academia, the impact of external quality assurance, and top level strategies for internationalisation. It also includes national diagrams showing key characteristics of academic staff categories.

The report is based mainly on qualitative data gathered by the Eurydice Network, covering higher education systems in 35 countries. The data collection focused on academic higher education staff who are primarily responsible for teaching and/or research. In addition, quantitative data from Eurostat and the European Education Tertiary Register (ETER) are also used, as well as information gathered from surveys developed for this report to academic staff Trade Unions and Quality Assurance agencies. [+]

CoverNational Student Fee and Support Systems in European Higher Education – 2016/17
Comisión Europea. Eurydice, 2016

When students plan for higher education, one important element to consider is how much it will cost and whether they can receive any financial support. In a Europe where people can study in other countries, reliable information on the costs of higher education is essential.

This report aims to provide both an overview of the main features of national fee and support systems and more detailed information on each individual country. Forty-two national sheets present the reality of fees and financial support available to students in public or government-dependent private higher education institutions in short cycle, first and second cycle students in 2016/17. In particular, the publication describes the range of fees charged to national, EU and international students and specifies the categories of students that are required to pay, and those that may be exempt. Similarly, it explains the types and amounts of public support available in the form of grants and loans, as well as tax benefits and family allowances where applicable.

Information covers the 28 EU Member States as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Norway, Serbia and Turkey. [+] 

CoverEntrepreneurship Education at School in Europe - 2016 Edition
Eurydice Report, 22 February 2016

Developing and promoting entrepreneurship education has been one of the key policy objectives of the EU institutions and Member States for many years. Indeed, in the context of high youth unemployment, economic crises and rapid changes related to our complex knowledge-based economy and society, transversal skills such as entrepreneurship are essential not only to shape the mindsets of young people, but also to provide the skills, knowledge and attitudes that are central to developing an entrepreneurial culture in Europe. However, although some countries have already been committed to fostering entrepreneurship education for more than a decade, others are just starting. 

Following the 2012 Eurydice report on entrepreneurship education, this new analysis captures the latest developments in Europe. It provides updated and more detailed information on strategies, curricula and learning outcomes, and also covers new themes such as funding schemes and teacher education. 

The report focuses on primary education, lower and general upper secondary education as well as school-based initial vocational education and training. It contains information for 2014/15 from 33 countries participating in the Eurydice network. In addition, national information sheets provide an overview of entrepreneurship education in each country. [+]

CoverHorizon Report. 2016 Higher Education Edition
New Consortium, 2016. [e-Book]

What is on the five-year horizon for higher education institutions? Which trends and technology developments will drive educational change? What are the challenges that we consider as solvable or difficult to overcome, and how can we strategize effective solutions? These questions and similar inquiries regarding technology adoption and educational change steered the collaborative research and discussions of a body of 58 experts to produce the NMC Horizon Report: 2016 Higher Education Edition, in partnership with the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI). This NMC Horizon Report series charts the five-year horizon for the impact of emerging technologies in colleges and universities across the globe. With more than 14 years of research and publications, it can be regarded as the world’s longest-running exploration of emerging technology trends and uptake in education.

The experts agreed on two long-term impact trends: advancing cultures of innovation, as well as fundamentally rethinking how universities and colleges work. These are just two of the 18 topics analyzed in the NMC Horizon Report: 2016 Higher Education Edition, indicating the key trends, significant challenges, and important technological developments that are very likely to impact changes in higher education around the world over the next five years.

Regarding the major obstacles for higher education, blending formal and informal learning is considered one of the solvable challenges — one that is already being addressed by programs at individual institutions. Cork Institute of Technology in Ireland has long recognized non-formal and prior learning, integrating students’ previous work and life experience into their curriculum designs.1 Some universities are also finding creative ways to leverage informal resources into coursework; marketing students at Indiana University, for example, use Instagram to explore and share successful campaign ideas.2 On the other hand, the experts identified balancing learners’ connected and unconnected lives as a wicked challenge — one that is impossible to define, let alone solve. As educational technology is rapidly advancing and evolving, it is difficult to always discern when and how to properly implement it to foster real transformation. [+]

CoverNational Student Fee and Support Systems in European Higher Education – 2015/16
European Commission, 2015 (Eurydice Report, 21 October 2015)

This annual report shows how fee and support systems (including grants and loans) work in higher education in Europe. In addition to providing a comparative overview of fees and financial support available for full-time students in 2015/16, it also includes individual country sheets outlining the main elements of national systems.

In particular, the publication describes the range of fees charged to students and specifies which categories of students are required to pay, and which may be exempt. Similarly it explains the levels of public support available in the form of grants and loans, as well as tax benefits and family allowances where applicable.

The report focuses on fees and support in public or government-dependent private higher education institutions for the first (Bachelor level) and second (Master level) cycles and does not cover private higher education institutions.

Information covers the 28 EU Member States as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Norway, Serbia and Turkey. [+]

CoverThe Organisation of the Academic Year in Higher Education, 2015/16
Eurydice Report, 1 September 2015 

This annually updated publication shows how the academic year is structured (beginning of the year, term times, holidays and examination periods) for each country in the Network. Where times may vary depending on types of (university or non-university) study programme, this is also indicated. [+]

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